John Dee and Thaumaturgy

zsd232 wrote: …John Dee is also a key author, but Enochian magic attributed to him was actually manufactured from a small portion of his surviving writings, recovered quite a long time after his death… I wrote: I’ve found I’m one of the few sorcerers who practice what John Dee meant tacitly by Thaumaturgy – what would be referred to as engineering abstractly. It seems like a lot of people practice Theurgy – Enochian magic, under the impression that’s what John Dee meant by Thaumaturgy. He was referencing the idea of the archetypal “black box” where a mechanism abstractly does something Read More



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