Physical Evocation

In fiction and fantasy, magical characters can shape magical forces into constructs of physical forces. For example, Raven from DC Comics can create constructs from the dark energy of her soul form, Constantine can throw fireballs, and Zatanna can summon swords. Evocation in the Dresden Files specifically refers to conjuring blasts of fire, shields of air, and other forms of magical constructs that are physical things. When trying to give physicality to a magical or psychic construct, many people are unable to get it to physically interact with anything, and based on that lack of interaction, some people conclude that Read More


Western mysticism is closer to Dungeons and Dragons Than You Would Think

I wrote: Fantasy magic and “real” magic are closer than you think. Mathematically speaking, the Kabbalic tree of life is a tree in the same sense as a perk tree in Skyrim where the ontological basis doesn’t necessarily have to describe a vector of reality for prima facie, they are just “empty symbols” where they are given semantic meaning. To say it a different way, you can algorithmically traverse the tree of life whether or not you believe it to be real, so you can deduce that the relations are consistent and formulas derived from those relations are true regardless Read More


Conservation Laws and Magical and Psychic Energy

I wrote: Gaffluence wrote: Does the first law of Thermodynamics apply to magical energies too? The law being that, energy cannot be created or destroyed, only transformed (simplified version).   The answer is no. Conservation of energy is due to a temporal translation invariance, as described in Noether’s theorem and via the Lagrangian. Energy conservation is a consequence of invariance under time translations. Something more abstract than time would not be beholden to that invariance and thus would not be conserved. If it is not physical, it would not be temporal, and if it is not temporal, it is not Read More


Abstract Algebra: Theory and Applications

The first half of the book presents group theory, through the Sylow theorems, with enough material for a semester-long course. The second-half is suitable for a second semester and presents rings, integral domains, Boolean algebras, vector spaces, and fields, concluding with Galois Theory.


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